Category Archives: Guest Posts

5 Irresistable Reasons to Go Solar!

Guest Post by John P. Basta

The growth of solar power is explosive, and it’s partly a result of the falling cost of solar panels. Even though it’s becoming quite affordable, this is not the only reason why an increasing number of people are going for this option. There are other benefits as well, and if you continue reading, you will learn what some other advantages of solar energy are. 

Continue reading 5 Irresistable Reasons to Go Solar!
blueberries and raspberries in white bowl outside

10 Fruits You Can Easily Grow On Your Homestead

Everybody has a different goal when it comes to homesteading. Some people like the idea of being able to grow all their own food simply for the old-fashioned, idyllic nature of it all. Some people are trying to prepare for long-term self-sufficiency or guard against natural disasters or emergencies. Others just want to save a bit of money at the grocery store. Continue reading 10 Fruits You Can Easily Grow On Your Homestead

What is CBD?

Guest Post By:   Aleecia Head ;  InfiniteCBD.com

WHAT IS CBD?

Our bodies are self regulating machines and all machines can be optimized, especially with the help of CBD products. The cannabis plant contains over 100 different cannabinoids or molecular compounds in plants called phytocannabinoids. They trigger cellular activity throughout the body. Cannabinoids help direct the effects to the right place. The most dominant cannabinoid is the psychoactive THC or tetrahydrocannabinol. Following close behind is it’s non-psychoactive brother CBD, or cannabidiol. Not only can we supplement CBD, we also create it within. Research is just unlocking the secrets and benefits of cannabidiol.

Human bodies naturally produce these compounds through our endocannabinoid system. Our bodies stay in homeostasis with the endocannabinoid system or the ECS. It works alongside the thyroid, endocrine and the peripheral nervous system. Our ECS manages our cognitive functions and emotions. Internal endocannabinoids and plant-derived phytocannabinoids both activate the endocannabinoid system. Fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH, and other varieties of amino acids are mediators that break down endocannabinoids. The naturally occuring anandamide from our ECS attaches to the CB1 receptors without the high feeling. With CBD, the calming effect can be felt for longer as it stops enzymes from disrupting the anandamide. Active ECS sites host the CB1 and CB2 receptors.

Neurons in the brain with a nucleus inside

Cannabinoids bind to different receptors throughout the body and brain. THC mainly binds to the CB1 receptor acting as an activator. The largest population of receptors can be found in the brain, research is coming to find. High activity of activators occur in regions that regulate bodily functions, like the hippocampus, spinal cord, and cerebellum. It moderates the duration and feelings of dysphoria, pain and our memory. Other CB1 receptors can be found in the cell nerves, tissue, organs and supports other glandular systems. CB2 receptors focus on helping the autoimmune system and enhancing anti-inflammatory properties. Both CB1 and CB2 receptors are found in immune cells. More CB2 receptors are found in white blood cells and the spleen. Each receptor is crucial to a functioning endocannabinoid system.

Adverse effects can happen when the body doesn’t produce enough internal endocannabinoids. Scientists are just starting to acknowledge the effects of an endocannabinoid deficiency and what it looks like. When the ECS function lowers, it’s reflected in enzyme change. Pain tolerance, sleep and mood degradation could be signs that the body is deprived, studies show.

CBD stimulates natural endogenous cannabinoids and directs them to activate without the psychotropic effects of THC. When THC is present, it creates a direct artificial effect on the CB1 and CB2 receptors. In fact, CBD can be used to counteract the effects of THC when one over consumes. It helps bring your body back to balance and reestablishes harmony within. At Infinite CBD, we use pure CBD isolate. Our Colorado grown, industrial hemp produces a clean and refined CBD isolate that tests above 99% THC free. Full spectrum oils use all of the cannabinoids from the whole cannabis plant. We’ve singled out our favorite cannabinoid, CBD, and allow it shine exclusively.

To enhance the effects of CBD, terpenes can be added to provide specific relief. Terpenoids, also found in ordinary plant’s resin, provide the oils that gives flowering fauna their aromatic presence. Over 200 non-psychoactive terpenes are in cannabis and have been found to have medicinal properties, similar to essential oils. Infinite CBD offers a wide array of terpenes that can be added to specific products to amplify the effect on the body. Linalool, the terpene in lavender oils, helps aid in relaxation while limonene, what gives oranges their fragrance, provides relief from anxiety. When combined with CBD, the therapeutic pair amplifies the medicinal properties and its effects on the body.

The breadth of CBD uses continues to grow as we learn more about the compound. From general anxiety and pain to specific ailments, CBD can help. The method of consumption will also change the way it affects the body. Topicals will help spot specific pain points on the body and is directly absorbed into the bloodstream. Smoking breaks the blood brain barrier while sublingual methods can take longer to absorb. Our Nano product is water soluble and designed to be broken down quicker by the body.

Overall, our bodies are designed to regulate CBD and uses it to boost our systems. The effects and ailments that can be helped by using a natural product are still being observed but so far the potential is positive. The possibilities of CBD are infinite and we’re only just diving in.

If you want to purchase any of their great products feel free to click on the Banner on Our Home Page…and Yes, we do get a commission on each sale.

 

Cool Coffee Tables for your Home

About the Author:

This post is made by Mark who has a blog called Foosball Zone. On his blog, he has many articles about foosball in light of the fact that he needs to show to individuals around him all how astounding foosball is. For some intriguing foosball articles including the foosball table and coffee table, visit his blog on this link: http://www.foosballzone.com/foosball-coffee-table/ Continue reading Cool Coffee Tables for your Home

How To Plant An Onion That Has Sprouted? Grab These 9 Easy Steps Now!

Our Guest Article  is from Lucy Clark, Chief Editor at Garden Ambition

Hi there! I’m Lucy – founder of GardenAmbition.com and  
I’m a self-confessed garden fanatic. Gardening has always been a passion of mine and 
will always be my favorite pastime. Now that I am married and have one adorable son, I 
have the time to write and share my personal experiences with other garden enthusiasts 
like me.

Did you know how to plant an onion that has sprouted? If not, then now is the best time to add spice and yummy flavors to raw or cooked dishes through growing your very own onions. But how can you grow one?

 

 

Compared to other vegetables and plants, onion can grow again through planting either the part with a rooted mass on the bottom or an entire onion bulb. As soon as you planted and watered it, the roots located at the bottom will start to develop. After that, green onions will start to grow right at the top of the old onion.

HOW CAN YOU GROW A SPROUTED ONION?

Consider these step-by-step procedures if you want know how to plant an onion that has sprouted:

A Small onion held by hand with fertilizer

 

  1. Choose a healthy-looking onion which has sprouts in 8 inches or 12 inches pots. Pick one in every pot. Don’t forget to cut off rotted, pitted, or moldy parts prior to planting. Take care and maintain the core and the roots of the bulb.
  2. Start filling every pot with a good potting mix. As much as possible, leave some inches space on the top.
  3. Create a hole in the middle of the soil which about the depth and width of the vegetable.
  4. After that, put every onion in one pot carefully while layering it with enough soil to allow the base of the shoots meets the surface of the soil.
  5. Gently but firmly press down the soil to get rid of the air pockets.
  6.  Then thoroughly water the pot until the water goes out from the drainage holes.
  7. Next thing to do when you want to learn how to plant an onion that has sprouted is that you have to place the pots under a shaded spot for a few weeks. Let them get sufficient amount of sunlight but never expose them directly to the light. You should know that their roots need time to adjust and cultivate. Moreover, don’t forget to add fertilizer. You can also used shredded leaves and twigs as a natural fertilizer for your onions.

 

A closer look of onion while inside the plantation

  1. Slowly expose them to more sunlight after a couple of weeks. You may start at partial shade, then after some time, allow them to have a full sun exposure.
  2. If necessary, harvest the sprouts. You could utilize onion sprouts on anything you would utilize onion. It will surely make a delightful garnish.

 

IS IT SAFE TO EAT SPROUTED ONIONS?

The answer to that question would be a resounding Yes. It’s still good especially if the shoots and roots are still tiny. In fact, some individuals out there love to eat sprouted onions. This vegetable is well-known with vegans as they contain plenty of proteins.

 

Closer look of onions in the field

Just be sure to check for rot or mold particularly if this thing has been stuck around in a cool and dark area for more than one week. When you notice that there are molds, simply cut that part out and eat the rest. However, if the onion is already black in color or too mushy, throw it away.

 

WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO PLANT ONIONS?

Another thing to take note if you are determined to learn how to plant an onion that has sprouted is the right time to grow it. Many people plant their own onion as soon as spring comes. However, did you know that it is possible to have a head start right on your harvest through planting during fall too?

 

A fresh sprout in an onion

Why opt to plant during fall? Primarily, this is the time when there just a few tasks that you need to do. In addition to that, onions that are planted at this moment are more reliable and more productive than their counterparts. Most of the time, they are less prone to pests, which enjoy munching on these vegetables. To get rid of these pests, spray chemicals.

TIME TO HARVEST!

After knowing how to plant an onion that has sprouted, it’s about time to learn how to harvest it. Once you’ve noticed that the growing onion raised a bit out of the soil, and the leaves begin to turn yellow, this already indicates that it is time for harvest.

 

A bulb onion which has a short sprout

Generally, through bending its leaves, you are stopping them from growing further. Cut off the flowing sap so that you can divert all energy of the plant into the growing bulb. Approximately 50% of the top should be broken over prior to harvesting onions.

You can leave the onion in an open sunlight for a couple of days to dry the tops and necks. Take note that it is not advisable for extremely hot areas. Better use shady, airy places to avoid direct sunlight which might damage the bulb.

Fresh onions which can be found in the market

FINAL THOUGHTS

There you go – the things you need to know on how to plant an onion that has sprouted. Just like other veggies out there, you need to exert effort, time, and accuracy to achieve better results. Planting onions, as an essential kitchen staple, is a great help. Aside from the fact that it reduces the need to buy from supermarkets, it also assures you that you will receive fresh vegetables.

Thank you for reading this article, and don’t forget to share! Hope it helps you a lot.

How To Become A Prepper – Without Even Trying!

Our Guest Author, Dan Sullivan has submitted this great article for Preppers who are beginning or experienced homesteaders. Feel free to use this great advice and follow him Here OR Join his forums Here

 

How To Become A Prepper —- Without Even Trying!

If the title puzzles you, it’s because, as a homesteader, you’re already prepped for various emergencies and may not even know it. You already make your own food, harvest rainwater, raise animals, maybe even have a generator or a few solar panels. Unlike most people , you’ll be able to put food on the table even when something bad happens like an economic collapse or a prolonged grid-down situation.

Now, I’m not saying you need to prep for Doomsday or some other far-fetched scenario. Quite the opposite. In this article, I want to reveal to you some of the scenarios that are actually likely to affect you, your family and your homestead, as well as give you basics survival advice.

Like I said, you’re probably doing some of these things because you’re a homesteader, but I’m sure many others are not on your to-do list, in which case I’m glad I helped you uncover these holes in your emergency preparedness plans.

#1. Basic Preparations

I’m sure you probably have some sort back-up if the lights go out for a few hours, maybe some food set aside… but what if next time it’ll last a week? You’ll need much more than flashlights, but have no fear because the things you need are not only easy to procure but also cheap.

Consider:

  • lanterns, hand-crank flashlights, chem lights and those garden solar lights that recharge themselves during the day
  • making a blackout box where you can keep most of this stuff, including candles, matches, a solar battery charger and, of course, batteries
  • some other means of heating yourself such as fire wood, a clay pot heater (ineffective but still) and, as a last resort, blankets

Blackouts aren’t just about the lights going out. You need to consider all the things that can happen. For example, what if one occurs during the winter, when there’s snow and freezing temperatures and you can’t leave the house for a couple of weeks?

Things like extra food (tuna cans, beans, rice, peanut butter, honey), water, flashlights, an emergency radio – these aren’t just things you see on boring emergency lists; they are things you need.

Our Recommendations: Get What You Need here!

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#2. Water

Literally any kind of emergency could mean you run out of water. You’ll need it for much more than drinking: consider you have to wash clothes, do the dishes, take care of personal hygiene, water your garden and so on.

Now, I’m not trying to be overly negative and suggest that your water could get contaminated (though I do read regular news of rivers getting contaminated), but consider the more likely scenario of when your faucets stop working.

Consider the following:

  • one of those WaterBOBs that you keep in your bathroom and, when you hear news that water might run out, you put it in the bath tub and fill it with all the water you can
  • a rainwater harvesting system (mandatory if you have animals, particularly cows, which drink a lot), but also means to purify that water, such as a Sawyer Mini, which can process up to 100,000 gallons
  • digging a well in your back yard (you’d need to make a study and see if you actually have water underneath)
  • means to store larger amounts of water in large containers
  • and even means to reuse it, such as flushing the toilet with the water you use in the kitchen (the so-called grey water)
  • a few water filters that will allow you to make water drinkable, such as the LifeStraw or the ones made by Berkey, just keep in mind they don’t filter heavy metals (you’d need one of those filters made by ZeroWater for that)

#3. Bugging Out

Though, as a homesteader, you’re probably much better of hunkering down in case of a disaster, you always have to consider the possibility of you being thrown away out of your home. A huge flood, a major hurricane, a wildfire, in cases like these you have no chance of staying inside your home; you just have to go.

Bugging out, or evacuating in plain terms, is not hard, but it does take some planning. First, you need a vehicle such as a car or an RV that you’ll use to make your escape. It needs to be properly equipped for all seasons, including food, water, blankets and flashlights (in case you remain stranded somewhere on the side of the road).

Next, you need to know all the possible ways to get out. With disaster on your tail, you may have minutes to evacuate, and you can’t afford getting stuck in a traffic jam or hitting a dead end. Every second will count.

Speaking of vehicles, you need to make arrangements to take as many things with you as possible. A large trunk will help, maybe even a trailer or a rooftop cargo carrier.

Then, we have the preppers all-time favorite, the bug out bag. We like to spend time tweaking it, making it lighter, smaller and, of course, to add more things to it. My list of over 150 bug out bag items will help, just make sure you stay away from cheap items that might break or not work at all when you need them.

Last but not least, you’d need a place to evacuate to. Even if you don’t have one, you should still prepare to bug out. Better to sleep in your car than die in your home, but really, any place that can keep you safe can be considered a “bug out location”: a friend’s house, a piece of land that belongs to a relative etc.

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#4. Security

You need to secure your home, your family and yourself. I’m just pointing out the obvious here, but having a few guns, an alarm system, a couple of security cameras and some motion sensors will go a long way towards protecting your home, your garden and your livestock.

But you also have to consider your personal security. A concealed carry handgun is probably your best option, but there are others if you don’t like guns, things like pepper spray, stun guns and other alternative weapons.

#5. A Stockpile

I’m sure you probably have enough food to last you 1 – 2 weeks, but what if the next disaster will keep you inside for longer? A 1 month stockpile should be anyone’s goal, maybe even longer if you have the space to keep it all. Focus on the staples (rice, beans, honey etc.) but make sure you only get food you usually eat, and stay away from MREs and other survival foods. Most aren’t worth it.

Last But Not Least…

Besides what’s listed above, one other thing you can do to increase your chances of survival is to simply try new things. I’m talking about things that are useful in an emergency, such as:

  • outdoor cooking (useful when you don’t have fuel or electricity)
  • food preservation techniques (salting, smoking etc.)
  • fixing and even making your own clothes
  • woodworking
  • first aid
  • baking your own bread
  • fishing

These aren’t just meant to prep you for emergencies or to take up your time they can also be fun! So feel free to experiment…